❱❱ Chrome’s Cross-Platform Reading List


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Google’s been working on a fantastic new system for hanging onto articles you want to read and then pulling ’em up whenever you’re ready — kind of like Pocket or Instapaper, only it exists entirely in your browser and doesn’t require any extra apps or add-ons.

Well, for the first time, the feature is now readily available on Android in addition to the desktop front — but in both places, it’s up to you to find and activate it.

Here’s how, starting with the desktop end:

  • Type chrome:flags into the Chrome address bar (no matter what operating system or type of computer you’re using).
  • Type read later into the search box at the top of the screen that comes up.
  • Click the box next to the line labeled “Read Later” and change it to “Enabled.”
  • Click the Relaunch button in the lower-right corner of the screen.

On Android, the steps are essentially the same:

  • Type chrome:flags into the Chrome address bar on your phone.
  • Type read later into the search box at the top of the screen that comes up.
  • Tap the box beneath the line labeled “Read Later” and change it to “Enabled.”
  • Tap the Relaunch button in the lower-right corner of the screen.

Once you’ve got the feature activated in both places, all you’ve gotta do is use it! On the desktop, just right-click on the actual tab title of any page you want to save and look for the new “Add tab to reading list” option in the menu that comes up. On Android, you’ll press and hold a link to any page you want to save and then look for the new “Read later” option in the menu that pops up there. (Oddly enough, there’s currently no way to save a page via a link on the desktop — and no way to save a currently open page on Android. But hey, the feature is technically still under development! Hopefully we’ll gain those options before long.)

However you save something, it’ll then be available in your reading list on any device where you’re signed in. On a computer, look for the new “Reading list” button at the right side of Chrome’s bookmark bar (which you can toggle on and off with the Ctrl-Shift-B shortcut). And on your phone, tap the three-dot menu icon in Chrome’s upper-right corner, then select “Bookmarks” and find the new “Reading list” option there. (If you don’t see it right away, you might have to hit a back-facing arrow in the upper-left corner of the screen to get back to the main bookmark menu.)

Any page you save will instantly show up everywhere and be ready for reading — whenever you want and whether you’re online or off. Doesn’t get much simpler than that!

❱❱ Chrome’s Cross-Platform Reading List


This is excerpted from one of my recent Android Intelligence newsletter issues. Sign up to get tons of practical tips directly from me every week!

Sign up for Android Intelligence
and get your first issue right now.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Google’s been working on a fantastic new system for hanging onto articles you want to read and then pulling ’em up whenever you’re ready — kind of like Pocket or Instapaper, only it exists entirely in your browser and doesn’t require any extra apps or add-ons.

Well, for the first time, the feature is now readily available on Android in addition to the desktop front — but in both places, it’s up to you to find and activate it.

Here’s how, starting with the desktop end:

  • Type chrome:flags into the Chrome address bar (no matter what operating system or type of computer you’re using).
  • Type read later into the search box at the top of the screen that comes up.
  • Click the box next to the line labeled “Read Later” and change it to “Enabled.”
  • Click the Relaunch button in the lower-right corner of the screen.

On Android, the steps are essentially the same:

  • Type chrome:flags into the Chrome address bar on your phone.
  • Type read later into the search box at the top of the screen that comes up.
  • Tap the box beneath the line labeled “Read Later” and change it to “Enabled.”
  • Tap the Relaunch button in the lower-right corner of the screen.

Once you’ve got the feature activated in both places, all you’ve gotta do is use it! On the desktop, just right-click on the actual tab title of any page you want to save and look for the new “Add tab to reading list” option in the menu that comes up. On Android, you’ll press and hold a link to any page you want to save and then look for the new “Read later” option in the menu that pops up there. (Oddly enough, there’s currently no way to save a page via a link on the desktop — and no way to save a currently open page on Android. But hey, the feature is technically still under development! Hopefully we’ll gain those options before long.)

However you save something, it’ll then be available in your reading list on any device where you’re signed in. On a computer, look for the new “Reading list” button at the right side of Chrome’s bookmark bar (which you can toggle on and off with the Ctrl-Shift-B shortcut). And on your phone, tap the three-dot menu icon in Chrome’s upper-right corner, then select “Bookmarks” and find the new “Reading list” option there. (If you don’t see it right away, you might have to hit a back-facing arrow in the upper-left corner of the screen to get back to the main bookmark menu.)

Any page you save will instantly show up everywhere and be ready for reading — whenever you want and whether you’re online or off. Doesn’t get much simpler than that!

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and get your first issue right now.

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